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'm debra norville. >> stephanie: how about you jim? >> i'm katie couric. >> stephanie: what a news day yesterday. poor wolf blitzer. they'll have to leave it there. can you tell his accent from the surveillance video? what how would you be able to tell his accent from his surveillance video? >> were you able to see think pass port from the surveillance video. >> stephanie: the suspect was not arrested in the boston bombing, and he clearly was not darked skinned . oh other than that -- >> if he had been arrested he would have been dark skinned. >> stephanie: you remember hurricane katrina, we have done this with aisha tyler before. this is what happens when anchors have to fill time jim. oh, jack, look at all of those people, so hungry so poor so black. [ laughter ] [ wah wah ] >> stephanie: oh yes he did. it has provided all of the comedy fodder for aisha tyler and her husband, because she says literally at lunch every day she says i'm so hungry so black. [ applause ] >> stephanie: it's like a matinee performance every date their house. and there is a consolation
suspect's trip back home in 2012. tracking that for us, in some really heated testimony today, cnn's jim acosta. jim? lay out the information for us. what's being said? what is the controversy? >> reporter: well, chris, you're absolutely right, lawmakers on capitol hill are trying to get to the bottom of what was known about the older suspect who is now dead, tamerlan tsarnaev, and this trip ta hat he took to rusa last year. law makes want to know why is it that tamerlan tsarnaev was able to make this trip in the first place. should he have been stopped before he went overseas? when overseas what did he do? what was he up to when he was over there? some of this is stemming from some of the conflicting stories, quite frankly, chris, from federal officials over tamerlan tsarnaev's status. senator lindsey graham, republican from south carolina, told reporters yesterday that tamerlan was on a no-fly list, that he was on some sort of terror watch list a federal law enforcement official has told cnn that is not the case. and senator charles grassley, graham's republican colleague in the senate
and a house committee is set to look whether or not it should actually continue. chief correspondent jim angle is live in washington with more. hi, jim. >> reporter: hello, jenna. what started out as an effort to by ronald reagan to help people in rural areas to have a phone in case of emergencies what critics suspect is a new welfare program, listen. >> the cost has gone from $143 million a few years ago, to $2.2 billion today, a 15 times increase. >> reporter: now the cost of the program lept after cell phones were added in 2008. only those on low income programs such as welfare and food stamps legally qualify. but lawmakers say the program is out of control. >> i got a solicitation for a free phone at my apartment which is certainly not in a building where you're going to have people who are qualified for free phones. there is clearly money being wasted here. >> the fcc said in a recent year there were 270,000 beneficiaries that had more than one of these subsidized cell phones that is completely against the law right there. >> reporter: now funded by a small tax on all phone bills you can
are choosing fidelity. now get 200 free trades when you open an account. >>> welcome back to "squawk". jim is standing by at the cme in chicago. you've got the numbers. >> the numbers 352. and the claims number 368 on the continuing claims. it's about kind of where it is. the revision from last week up 2,000. so it's right kind of as expected. this was the big number. independent of last week's claims numbers over of last three weeks claims have been a big deal. they have indicated some sort of spring swoon. this is an indication how severe it is going to be. from the looks, it's not that big a deal. stock market up from that. these numbers came out as expected, which is not bad compared to two weeks ago. >> thank you for that. we've got reaction from steve liesman. are the numbers as positive as jim was portraying them? >> it's interesting, andrew. we have yet to see confirmation of that weak jobs report come up in the jobless claims. we have a speak up, some of it. now it has settled down back into that 350,000 range. you would think if it deteriorated as much as it has you would see som
[ ♪ theme ♪ ] >> stephanie: any way jim so i'm saying to jacki schechner when she's in my bed yesterday morning along with a bunch of other people -- >> what? >> stephanie: i'm sorry the camera is on. >> along with a bunch of other people? [ laughter ] >> stephanie: little titillating. i had a dinner party saturday night and it had more to do with -- jacki, we all partied a little hardy. it was a big slumber party. >> very responsible in l.a. if you're going to consume too many adult beverages to make the decision not to drive so that's what we did. lucky enough, stephanie has a home that's decorated like a bed and breakfast and you can pick your room. >> stephanie: exactly. just saying. not what you thought. >> would you like the naked marilyn photograph room. would you like the country breakfast room? >> stephanie: all right. anyway, i was trying to get jim's attention. good morning jacki. thank god it was a slow "newsweek" last week. >> we have lily tomlin today. >> stephanie: here's jacki schechner. >> happy monday. governor deval patrick is asking massachusetts residents
. let's bring in retired atf special agent in charge, nbc news analyst jim cavanaugh. jim, it's, it's a changing situation. but certainly it is a dramatic scene. it almost looks like a war zone, streets empty, we don't know how many officers are on the scene. but the tension seems to be remarkably high. there's some thought that perhaps dzhokah tsarnaev is holed up and is being negotiated with at this point. >> alex, that's exactly right. you know when you're in command of a situation like this, i always like to break it down to the main things that handle the main crisis points and address those. and there's three interlocking rings here that are affecting boston and the citizens. and that's what the commanders have got to focus on. one is the standoff with dzhokhar, we can talk about how that interlocks and what's going on there. the second is, the placement of another pressure cooker device in the city that they've located. and the question of are there more. and then the third interlocking circle is, whether or not there's these two accomplices, as pete williams described and ma
-three minutes after the hour. jim ward on air guitar. 1-800-steph-1-2 the phone number toll free from anywhere. todd in idaho, you are on the "stephanie miller show." hi, todd. >> caller: hi, how are ya? i was wondering why no one was talking about the warrantless access that the s.w.a.t. teams went from house to house in boston, i don't know if i would allow that. is that legal? >> stephanie: the house-to-house searches? >> caller: yeah. they have to have a warrant to do that, don't they? >> stephanie: i don't -- you know -- wow, i'm not certain. >> you would think. >> caller: i mean you were talking earlier about we live in a land of laws and that's one of the biggest ones -- >> how do you know they didn't have a warrant? >> caller: well, that's what i'm wondering. >> i think with something as high-pro file as this they wouldn't screw something like that up. >> stephanie: the miranda rights not being read right away -- clearly that was an emergency. perhaps i'm not as versed of my civil liberties as i should be. >> in danger of being punted. >> stephanie: exactly. >> talking
has now been canceled. clearly there is internal debate. jim walsh is a international security analyst. he calls boston home and, jim, good morning to you. >> good morning. bill: just the sense of debate that is quite clear what you put out and what you don't, what do you believe about that? >> i think there are a couple of considerations law enforcement is looking at. you don't want to put out a photo if in some way that tells the culprit or suspect something that enables them, makes it more difficult for them to find. you don't want to tip them off if you don't have to. particularly with the fbi some sense of the richard jewell episode that still hangs over their heads. just because you have a suspect that doesn't mean they're guilty. by releasing the photo you increase the pressure, the public will look for the person. think i they want to get their you can it is in a row before they go public with it. we're seeing something we have never seen before, bill as i went on facebook, crowd sourcing which can be a powerful in a positive way and in a negative way. bill: what is crowd sourc
korea. jim maseda joins us from seoul. hi, jim. >> reporter: hi, kelly. well, the past 24 hours have been a pretty good example of the unpredictability of kim junk union and his scene. after all of those signals, it turned out to be a very quiet day in north korea, focused entirely on those celebrations around founding father kim jong il's birthday. but then last night, there was a sudden new threat from the north korean military, which said it would strike south korea without warning if there were another anti-north protest in the south. so this was in reaction to a very small demonstration yesterday here in downtown seoul where a couple of effigies of kim jong un were burned. in the same message, he said the south must apologize for its undig phied acts before talks could happen. despite the angry ultimatum, there does seem to be a shift now towards what they call offramping or tamping down the volume and talking rather than confrontation. that said, those two medium range missiles are reportedly on their launchers in the eastern part of north korea ready to be fired. the south is
, mother jones has new research. this is shocking, jim. you will be shocked. new research confirms gun rampages are rising and armed civilians don't stop them. okay. we'll get to that. all of that stuff. >> stephanie: all of the stuff we've been talking about. because people like to say they don't have any -- yes we have facts! and statistics. all right. we'll get to all of that as we continue. 17 minutes after the hour. people carbonite. why? huh? why wouldn't you have carbonite just for the peace of mind alone. these days, everything we know or have is in our computers financial documents creative stuff, your music. >> videos. >> stephanie: right? you're busy. hard to remember stuff like that to back stuff up. remember you had to keep backing up. >> on floppy disks. >> stephanie: all the time. carbonite online back-up hassle free to back up your files. it backs up files to the cloud automatically and continuously when you're connected to the internet. carbonite does all of the work for you you don't have to remember to do it again. carbonite has a back-up plan that's right for you. $
. >> thank you, jim, and thank you for your leadership on the task force. and i want to express my thanks to the constitution project but also to all of my fellow task force members, what they brought to the table in terms of experience, wisdom, public service really made a difference in the development of this project and important report. as jim mentioned, there's more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those this morning, but we do want to hit some of the highlights. we hope you'll take the entire report, study it through, and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it's important because we as a nation have to get this right. i look back in history to the time during world war ii that we interned some japanese-america japanese-americans. at the time it seemed like the right and proper thing to do. but in light of history it was an error. and so today, this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post-9/11 environment. there's some key questions one of -- some key questions we wanted to address this poi
now. u.s. remember at the beginning of the iraq war, jim asked me a question, does this still hold true today? do movie stars need be afraid to speak out? and i would say, yes. the lesson is, if what you care about is your pocketbook, if you want to speak out and be pro patriotic and defend america right or wrong, you'll never get in trouble. if you want to be critical of foreign policy because you belief, as a citizen -- remember, we have a thing called the constitution. all men are created equal. everybody, at least from the beginning, white, male, 2 1, with property, could vote. since then we've expanded -- well, i'm not being sarcastic because in terms of the world to have any white male who was sovereign, that we were sovereign. the american revolution declared the people sovereign rather than a king or queen. you couldn't have a king or queen taking your land away because they had finch it to you through sovereign rights. so if every citizen has a right to say what they should or should not do in our government, we would think we could respect that, and yet at the very begi
force discussed their findings on >> thank you, jim, and thank you for your leadership on the task force, and i want to express my thanks to the constitution project, but also to all of my fellow task force members, what they brought to the table in terms of experience, wisdom, public service, really made a difference in the development of this project and important report. there's more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those this morning, but we do want to hit some of the highlights. we hope you'll take the entire report, study it through, and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it's important because we as a nation have to get this right. i look back in history to the time during world war ii that we interned some japanese- americans. at the time it seemed like the right and proper thing to do. but in the light of history, it was an error. and so today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post- 9/11 environment. were's some key questions wanted to address this morning. one is the treatment
thing in the world can happen to a city and dumb sportscasters will go, three hours, jim, this city forget there was a nuclear blast. >> something different was going on there. >> here, it can only happen in boston because boston is a one sports team town. at the end of the day, the sox that pull the entire team together. >> fenway. >> and fenway, the cathedral to a city. it had to be an amazing day there. >> it was. it was an amazingly emotional afternoon. it was a cathartic moment. a baseball game happened to have been played but it was if a tiny basilica on the back bay and the region was attracted to it. the suspected suspect had been successfully captured the evening before. neil diamond called the red sox switchboard. >> are you kidding me? >> called the red sox switchboard and said i'm in town, my name is neil diamond. i'd like to come and sing the song and he showed up. >> wow. >> to the surprise -- >> which, of course, people are watching that don't know, that's been a tradition. >> yeah, for a long, long time, many years. middle of the eighth inning, they sing it. >> it's
on this particular issue to comment on this and on her question of the political will. >> thank you very much, jim. if i knew the answer on political will, i suppose there would be more prophetic qualities to my history. one hopes that we will see it, one hopes that we will see immigration and gun control and other efforts. i spent my life as a diplomat and spent a good part of that life trying to importune other governments to live up to the rule of law. i was cha gripped, embarrassed -- chagrined, embarrassed and, indeed, in many ways felt undermined by the notion that our country which instructed me on numerous occasions to uphold the rule of law particularly indefinite detention without trial was something that we now practice and continue to practice despite all of the questions that people tend to want to raise about a war and prisoners of war and all of the rest. my sense is that we need a specific way forward. the report contains recommendations on a specific way forward; simply trial or military commission with rights and privileges equal to our article iii court or system. if that won't
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15